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Tom Allen

If at first you don't succeed, edit out your failures.

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U2:3.1 Apply design and research tools, methods and skills to record and interpret information and develop ideas for creative production.

Report on the SFX industry

In 1977 Star Wars Episode 4: A New Hope was released and the computer image that the rebel pilots viewed when attacking the Death Star was the first extensive use of animated 3-D Computer animation (or CGI).

In 1979 Alien was released and the film used a raster wireframe 3-D model rendering for the Nostromo’s navigational charts on its computer monitors. The film is best know for the chest-burster scene where a small alien bursts from one of the character’s chest before looking around and scurrying away.

In 1981 Raiders of the lost ark was released and it’s more remarkable shots were where a giant bolder was rolling after Harrison Ford’s character in the opening and the final image of the government warehouse where the Ark was stored —  a lengthy matte shot.

In 1986 Labyrinth was released and the opening CGI credits/title sequence featured a glass ball and a flying digital owl – the first realistic CGI animal. The film also included an impressive M.C. Escher-style production design, including the final “stairway sequence”

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Results from our Survey

Our results show that the people who answered the survey were 16-20, which is not surprising as our classmates filled out.

The results show that people enjoyed the story in an adventure film most, then the characters and then the effects. This is likely because the story and characters create the groundings for the world that the movie is set in. Another trend seems to be that choosing a favourite adventure film is either a very difficult task or a simple request. This is likely because people don’t know what their favourite as it a very broad spectrum.

Survey

BBFC

 

The BBFC is the British Board of Film Classification, they handle the classification of films in order to “Protect the public, and especially children, from content which might raise harm risk”

(http://www.bbfc.co.uk/about-bbfc/our-mission)

The difference between a PG rating and a 15 rating is the amount of swearing, if there is discriminatory language and/ or behaviour or drug taking.

The Criminal Law: The Criminal Law is a law where the BBFC cannot pass any material likely to infringe the criminal law. This is heavily influenced by the Obscene Publications acts of 1959 and 1964, The Cinematograph Films (Animals) Act 1937, The Animal Welfare Act 2006 and The Protection of Children Act 1978.

The Video Recordings Act: Video works (including films, TV programmes and video games) which are supplied on a disc, tape or any other device capable of storing data electronically must be classified by the BBFC unless they fall within the definition of an exempted work.

When considering whether to award a classification certificate to a work, or whether to classify a work at a particular category, the BBFC is required by the Act to have special regard (among the other relevant factors) to the likelihood of works being viewed in the home, and to any harm that may be caused to potential viewers or, through their behaviour, to society by the manner in which the work deals with:

  • criminal behaviour
  • illegal drugs
  • violent behaviour or incidents
  • horrific behaviour or incidents
  • human sexual activity.

In considering these issues the BBFC has in mind the possible effect not only on children but also on other vulnerable people.

Race Relations Act: The Race Relations Act 1976, which was changed to the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000, places a legal obligation on public authorities to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination and to promote equality of opportunity and good relations between persons of different racial groups.

In 2004, Examiners discussed whether the Act was relevant during their deliberations after seeing the film, The Passion of the Christ, which some commentators accused of being anti-Semitic. The BBFC’s conclusion was that it was neither anti-Semitic nor indeed blasphemous.

Screen Shot 2016-02-01 at 13.17.07

Cult film cliches and characteristics

Films such The Rocky Horror Picture show,images

The Big Lebowski, The Evil Dead, Donny Darko, They Live, Mad Max are classed as Cult films. These films aren’t necessarily praised by Critics however they have amassed a cult following among fans

a-texas-judge-cited-the-big-lebowski-in-a-legal-decision-2evildead1Donnie_Darko   images-2mad-max-2-1981-02-g

What makes these films great is the blend of special & practical effects, such as the Mad Max series which uses mostly practical effects to get the feeling of the movie is actually happening. Some of these films are seen as bad films but still have wide audience appeal. They manage this by having interesting stories, memorable characters and scenes.

Key advances in sfx from 1977 onwards

In 1977 Star Wars Episode 4: A New Hope was released and the computer image that the rebel pilots viewed when attacking the Death Star was the first extensive use of animated 3-D Computer animation (or CGI).

In 1979 Alien was released and the film used a raster wireframe 3-D model rendering for the Nostromo’s navigational charts on its computer monitors. The film is best know for the chest-burster scene where a small alien bursts from one of the character’s chest before looking around and scurrying away.

In 1981 Raiders of the lost ark was released and it’s more remarkable shots were where a giant bolder was rolling after Harrison Ford’s character in the opening and the final image of the government warehouse where the Ark was stored —  a lengthy matte shot.

In 1986 Labyrinth was released and the opening CGI credits/title sequence featured a glass ball and a flying digital owl – the first realistic CGI animal. The film also included an impressive M.C. Escher-style production design, including the final “stairway sequence”

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